Make No Small Plans: Pedal Power Edition

Two videos to start off your week. Each is an idea for adapting “pedal power” to high speeds. Here’s the first, the E-Rockit. It’s an electric bike that can go up to 80 kmph (around 50 mph). The pedals control the speed of the motor, which allows the bike to be carbon emission free.

Why you should watch the video: an eccentric German inventor yelling at you. Two videos to start off your week. Each is an idea for adapting “pedal power” to high speeds. Here’s the first, the E-Rockit. It’s an electric bike that can go up to 80 kmph (around 50 mph). The pedals control the speed of the motor, which allows the bike to be carbon emission free.

Why you should watch the video: an eccentric German inventor yelling at you. Two videos to start off your week. Each is an idea for adapting “pedal power” to high speeds. Here’s the first, the E-Rockit. It’s an electric bike that can go up to 80 kmph (around 50 mph). The pedals control the speed of the motor, which allows the bike to be carbon emission free.

The second is the Schweeb. It’s a pedal-powered monorail. Really. This one doesn’t embed, so click over here.

So while the Schweeb is patently ridiculous, the E-Rockit actually seems like something with a market. More importantly, it’s always good to see innovation happening around the platform of the bicycle. Bikes have been around for quite a long time in basically their current form; attempts to use what we know to reimagine cycling have real value.

(h/t Infrastucturist, Transportationist)

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  • Ahmet

    Hi, interesting topic – I have just bought an electric bike that I use to get to work everyday. I Just plug in at work to recharge it and then cycle home.
    Absolutely love the bike, it was cheap and simple to use. I got it from http://www.elecbikeco.com they seemed good but I am sure there are many other companies out there too.
    Good luck
    Ahmet