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U.N. General Assembly Declares “Decade of Action for Road Safety”
Traffic in cities like Bangalore can be deadly. Photo by Roy Sinai.

Traffic in cities like Bangalore can be deadly. Photo by Roy Sinai.

The U.N. General Assembly proclaimed on Tuesday that 2011-2020 will be the “Decade of Action for Road Safety,” recognizing the “tremendous global burden” of fatalities and injuries resulting from road crashes each year.

Road traffic crashes kill 1.2 million people and injure up to 50 million each year, according to the World Health Organization. The World Bank says that if nothing is done to make roads safer, road traffic crashes could become the fourth or fifth leading cause of death in low- and middle-income countries by 2030.

Part of the problem is the explosive growth in the number of vehicles — from cars to motorcycles — exacerbated by high speeds and a lack of regulation. Children are the most at risk.

The U.N. General Assembly is calling on the WHO, the U.N. Road Safety Collaboration and other stakeholders to prepare a “plan of action” for the decade. It is also encouraging Member States to plan their own road traffic casualty-reduction targets.

EMBARQ, the producer of this blog, recently received a grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies to implement programs in low- and middle-income countries to prevent death and disability from road traffic crashes. You can read more about its work here.

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  • Precisely why I don’t live in Arizona, Jonathan.

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • Another reason to crack down on idling. Jonathan, bring it!!

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • At least the Times’ coverage of the MTA hearings says it all

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • You know, if the 108th had a crackdown on idling, in the same spirit as the one-day crackdowns on distracted driving that the NYPD is known to do

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • Pingback: Streetsblog New York City » Today’s Headlines()

  • Larry Littlefield

    "New Jersey Transit proposed raising fares by 25 percent system-wide and reducing service to help close a $300 million budget deficit…Governor Chris Christie, a Republican who took office Jan. 19, said last month he was cutting NJ Transit’s $296 million annual subsidy by 11 percent, or $33 million, to help close a $2.2 billion deficit in the state budget for the current fiscal year, which ends June 30."

    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aO1ifR3q3kWY&pos=9

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • At least the Times’ coverage of the MTA hearings says it all:

    "Although many of those at the hearings directed their anger toward the transportation agency, the cuts are a direct result of lower tax revenues and a decision by state legislators to reduce the agency’s funds."

    Coat hung on coat rack.

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • Re: Queens Gazette. You know, if the 108th had a crackdown on idling, in the same spirit as the one-day crackdowns on distracted driving that the NYPD is known to do, perhaps the Ford Econoline drivers would stop leaving the keys in the car and the motor running.

    I am more intrigued by the story of the homicide victim found under the Queensboro Bridge. "[Deputy Insp.] Kavanagh said it was evident she was from Manhattan." How?

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • ddartley

    From the Queens Gazette article:
    "Several of these thefts were brought on because of keys left in the ignition while the owners went away."

    Another reason to crack down on idling. Jonathan, bring it!!

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • Precisely why I don’t live in Arizona, Jonathan.

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • J. Mork, if you need to pee, you should take the train! Reason number umpty-eleven to support high-speed rail.

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • I was hoping the rest stop story would be more heartwarming (a la the it’s-hard-to-park-in-Queens stories. But even I acknowledge that people have to pee sometimes.

    Are rest stops around here subsidized? I kind of assumed that they are paid for by the businesses who operate there — they are always overpriced, after all.

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • fixed the Hevesi title. thanks Cap’n.

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog

  • Zulunova sounds promising – it’s about time we elected a Zulu to the Assembly – but like most candidates, she needs to be brought up to speed on transportation issues. Rather than saying, "Elect me and I’ll restore funding to the Q74," she blames the MTA.

    Also, Hevesi is in the Assembly, not the Senate. Zulunova’s main political experience is as chief of staff to former Senator John Sabini, who opposed congestion pricing and resigned after pleading guilty to driving while ability impaired.

    This comment was originally posted on Streetsblog