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Tip of the Helmet: Bird Names for Bike Crossings and Capital Bikeshare Swag
Have a bird name for the new bike lights at New Hampshire Ave and U St. NW? Let us know in the comments section below! Photo via DDOTDC.

Have a bird name for the new bike lights at New Hampshire Ave and U St. NW? Let us know in the comments section below! Photo via DDOTDC

Two recent developments in D.C. merit a Tip of the Helmet, the second installment of our Colbert-inspired series to highlight recent promising developments in the sustainable transport world.

New contraflow lanes, “bike boxes” (areas for bikes to stop in front of vehicles at intersections) and traffic signals for cyclists have been installed on the two blocks of New Hampshire Avenue connecting from U Street.  The traffic signals are cyclist-activated light-controlled crossings — now we just need to think of a bird name for them. (There are already Pelicans and HAWKS — how about Eagles for the nation’s capital?)  For more on the new cyclist infrastructure at this notoriously dangerous intersection, you can read this post on Greater Greater Washington.

Also, you can now sign up for Capital Bikeshare in preparation for its September launch. If you’re among the first 2,000 to sign up, you earn the status of “Founding Member,” which earns you not only bragging rights, but also a special edition key and American Apparel t-shirt!

A new contraflow bike lane on New Hampshire Avenue. Photo via DDOTDC.

A new contraflow bike lane on New Hampshire Avenue. Photo via DDOTDC.

New bike traffic signals on New Hampshire Avenue tell cyclists when they can continue onto 16th Street. Photo via DDOTDC.

New cyclist-activated bike traffic signals on New Hampshire Avenue tell cyclists when they can continue onto 16th Street. Photo via DDOTDC.

The stop line for cars was moved back to create a new "bike box" where bikes can wait for the light to change and stay highly visible to vehicles around them. Photo via DDOTDC.

The stop line for cars was moved back to create a new "bike box" where bikes can wait for the light to change and stay highly visible to vehicles around them. Photo via DDOTDC.

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